Memento Mori | Philosophy | Freesh Mind | Happiness | Death

Death Brings Me Happiness

For me thinking about dying all day every day gives me a peace of mind.

I’m going to take you on a long journey to explain this. I have recently (since this post) have been getting into philosophy. Going deep into the learning of this I have found a common theme of death and being okay with dying.

Why is it ok?

From my interpretation, being okay with dying is the highest form of peace because it happens to everyone so we might as well not fear the thing we all fear or at least come to terms with it for what it is. In philosophy, this is looked upon as freeing the soul into wherever it goes if it goes anywhere at all.

To die with a sense of strength is the highest honor. If you can die for your beliefs or thoughts (if of good nature) then that is a life to be proud of. Now to give a whole summary of what you think good nature is; that would be a different post but for now, I will try and bring some light to this situation with some material I find extremely helpful.

To begin we must know this fact of life itself. I find this video very helpful in explaining life as we know in simple terms.

[Note: Do Not comment on this blog about this video. If you want to collab and create a discussion regarding this video please do it in the link here with the video. All comments are for this blog in general. Thank you:) Also you can search for almost anything that was in the video in these links if you have to go back to something.
Also Note*  Collaborating is amazing. Critical feedback is welcome. I am keeping it Good Vibes Only anything else will be deleted. Share The Love. No spam or personal branding!!!! Thank you. Let’s make some new ideas and have fun:)]

 

To Blow Your Mind Even More

 

[Note: Do Not comment on this blog about this video. If you want to collab and create a discussion regarding this video please do it in the link here with the video. All comments are for this blog in general. Thank you:) Also you can search for almost anything that was in the video in these links if you have to go back to something.
Also Note*  Collaborating is amazing. Critical feedback is welcome. I am keeping it Good Vibes Only anything else will be deleted. Share The Love. No spam or personal branding!!!! Thank you. Let’s make some new ideas and have fun:)]

 

What is God?

Now that we have a sense of what we are made up of we can move forward to a common understanding. I know this is a touchy subject and I’m just going to put what I think as of now. I’m free to talk about this ever ending subject more but this is what I think as of now.  To be honest I don’t fucking know what is out there and that is okay.

So God or a God to me (I don’t even know why I capitalized if I even should haha). But to me after seeing patterns and patterns of this is just in simple terms Nature. Now, what is nature? Nature is as Wikipedia will put – Nature, in the broadest sense, is the natural, physical, or material world or universe. “Nature” can refer to the phenomenaof the physical world, and also to life in general. The study of nature is a large part of science. Although humans are part of nature, human activity is often understood as a separate category from other natural phenomena.

So we are all gods among each other and everything has a soul is what I think (maybe). Do I think there is an ultimate creator? Maybe

Do I think that we are in a simulation? Maybe

Do I think that God is just another word for unexplainable? Maybe

Do I think this is all a joke? Maybe

But the one thing I know is that we need a common understanding. This is why there is not as much progress as there should be because we are fighting old beliefs and systems. The only thing that we can control is to put our ego down and admit we don’t know shit and see how much we can learn just from “knowing” that.

Here is a picture and videos to help explain our ego

 

 

[Note: Do Not comment on this blog about this video. If you want to collab and create a discussion regarding this video please do it in the link here with the video. All comments are for this blog in general. Thank you:) Also you can search for almost anything that was in the video in these links if you have to go back to something.
Also Note*  Collaborating is amazing. Critical feedback is welcome. I am keeping it Good Vibes Only anything else will be deleted. Share The Love. No spam or personal branding!!!! Thank you. Let’s make some new ideas and have fun:)]

Besides my rant, the patterns just keep popping up and I am trying to bring them to light.

Going to the common theme of nature in everything, philosophy is just putting in terms of what nature is. That is why I am so strongly pulled towards learning about it. This is just a common ground for thinking and interpreting. With this in mind as common ground, it then gets interpreted by all these religions who think they are the best like sports teams and there is no progress made expect people dying for their belief of something that is another interpretation of nature with a different face aka religion.

I am all for the beliefs and values of some religions but we have to know where this knowledge is getting interpreted from and that is nature. We are all on the same team (progress).

Here is what philosophy is from Wikipedia

Link – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy

Philosophy (from Greek φιλοσοφίαphilosophia, literally “love of wisdom”[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existenceknowledgevaluesreasonmind, and language.[5][6]The term was probably coined by Pythagoras (c. 570–495 BCE). Philosophical methods include questioningcritical discussionrational argument, and systematic presentation.[7][8] Classic philosophical questions include: Is it possible to know anything and to prove it?[9][10][11] What is most real? Philosophers also pose more practical and concrete questions such as: Is there a best way to live? Is it better to be just or unjust (if one can get away with it)?[12] Do humans have free will?[13]

With that to sink in here is a great Letter from Tao of Seneca explaining philosophy further and then some letters on nature and despising death.

Thank you Tim,

Link – https://tim.blog/2017/07/06/tao-of-seneca/

LETTER 16

On Philosophy, the Guide of Life

It is clear to you, I am sure, Lucilius, that no man can live a happy life, or even a supportable life, without the study of wisdom; you know also that a happy life is reached when our wisdom is brought to completion, but that life is at least endurable even when our wisdom is only begun. This idea, however, clear though it is, must be strengthened and implanted more deeply by daily reflection; it is more important for you to keep the resolutions you have already made than to go on and make noble ones. You must persevere, must develop new strength by continuous study, until that which is only a good inclination becomes a good settled purpose.

Hence you no longer need to come to me with much talk and protestations; I know that you have made great progress. I understand the feelings which prompt your words; they are not feigned or specious words. Nevertheless I shall tell you what I think—that at present I have hopes for you, but not yet perfect trust. And I wish that you would adopt the same attitude towards yourself; there is no reason why you should put confidence in yourself too quickly and readily. Examine yourself; scrutinize and observe yourself in divers ways; but mark, before all else, whether it is in philosophy or merely in life itself[1] that you have made progress.

Philosophy is no trick to catch the public; it is not devised for show. It is a matter, not of words, but of facts. It is not pursued in order that the day may yield some amusement before it is spent, or that our leisure may be relieved of a tedium that irks us. It moulds and constructs the soul; it orders our life, guides our conduct, shows us what we should do and what we should leave undone; it sits at the helm and directs our course as we waver amid uncertainties. Without it, no one can live fearlessly or in peace of mind. Countless things that happen every hour call for advice; and such advice is to be sought in philosophy.

Perhaps someone will say: “How can philosophy help me, if Fate exists? Of what avail is philosophy, if God rules the universe? Of what avail is it, if Chance governs everything? For not only is it impossible to change things that are determined, but it is also impossible to plan beforehand against what is undetermined; either God has forestalled my plans, and decided what I am to do, or else Fortune gives no free play to my plans.”

Whether the truth, Lucilius, lies in one or in all of these views, we must be philosophers; whether Fate binds us down by an inexorable law, or whether God as arbiter of the universe has arranged everything, or whether Chance drives and tosses human affairs without method, philosophy ought to be our defence. She will encourage us to obey God cheerfully, but Fortune defiantly; she will teach us to follow God and endure Chance.

But it is not my purpose now to be led into a discussion as to what is within our own control—if foreknowledge is supreme, or if a chain of fated events drags us along in its clutches, or if the sudden and the unexpected play the tyrant over us; I return now to my warning and my exhortation, that you should not allow the impulse of your spirit to weaken and grow cold. Hold fast toit and establish it firmly, in order that what is now impulse may become a habit of the mind.

If I know you well, you have already been trying to find out, from the very beginning of my letter, what little contribution it brings to you. Sift the letter, and you will find it. You need not wonder at any genius of mine; for as yet I am lavish only with other men’s property. But why did I say “other men”? Whatever is well said by anyone is mine. This also is a saying of Epicurus:[2] “If you live according to nature, you will never be poor; if you live according to opinion, you will never be rich.”

Nature’s wants are slight; the demands of opinion are boundless. Suppose that the property of many millionaires is heaped up in your possession. Assume that fortune carries you far beyond the limits of a private income, decks you with gold, clothes you in purple, and brings you to such a degree of luxury and wealth that you can bury the earth under your marble floors; that you may not only possess, but tread upon, riches. Add statues, paintings, and whatever any art has devised for the luxury; you will only learn from such things to crave still greater.

Natural desires are limited; but those which spring from false opinion can have no stopping-point. The false has no limits. When you are traveling on a road, there must be an end; but when astray, your wanderings are limitless. Recall your steps, therefore, from idle things, and when you would know whether that which you seek is based upon a natural or upon a misleading desire, consider whether it can stop at any definite point. If you find, after having travelled far, that there is a more distant goal always in view, you may be sure that this condition is contrary to nature. Farewell.

 

LETTER 5

On the Philosopher’s Mean

I commend you and rejoice in the fact that you are persistent in your studies, and that, putting all else aside, you make it each day your endeavour to become a better man. I do not merely exhort you to keep at it; I actually beg you to do so. I warn you, however, not to act after the fashion of those who desire to be conspicuous rather than to improve, by doing things which will rouse comment as regards your dress or general way of living.

Repellent attire, unkempt hair, slovenly beard, open scorn of silver dishes, a couch on the bare earth, and any other perverted forms of self-display, are to be avoided. The mere name of philosophy, however quietly pursued, is an object of sufficient scorn; and what would happen if we should begin to separate ourselves from the customs of our fellow-men? Inwardly, we ought to be different in all respects, but our exterior should conform to society.

Do not wear too fine, nor yet too frowzy, a toga. One needs no silver plate, encrusted and embossed in solid gold; but we should not believe the lack of silver and gold to be proof of the simple life. Let us try to maintain a higher standard of life than that of the multitude, but not a contrary standard; otherwise, we shall frighten away and repel the very persons whom we are trying to improve. We also bring it about that they are unwilling to imitate us in anything, because they are afraid lest they might be compelled to imitate us in everything.

The first thing which philosophy undertakes to give is fellow feeling with all men; in other words, sympathy and sociability. We part company with our promise if we are unlike other men. We must see to it that the means by which we wish to draw admiration be not absurd and odious. Our motto,[1] as you know, is “Live according to Nature”; but it is quite contrary to nature to torture the body, to hate unlaboured elegance, to be dirty on purpose, to eat food that is not only plain, but disgusting and forbidding.

Just as it is a sign of luxury to seek out dainties, so it is madness to avoid that which is customary and can be purchased at no great price. Philosophy calls for plain living, but not for penance; and we may perfectly well be plain and neat at the same time. This is the mean of which I approve; our life should observe a happy medium between the ways of a sage and the ways of the world at large; all men should admire it, but they should understand it also.

“Well then, shall we act like other men? Shall there be no distinction between ourselves and the world?” Yes, a very great one; let men find that we are unlike the common herd, if they look closely. If they visit us at home, they should admire us, rather than our household appointments. He is a great man who uses earthenware dishes as if they were silver; but he is equally great who uses silver as if it were earthenware. It is the sign of an unstable mind not to be able to endure riches.

But I wish to share with you today’s profit also. I find in the writings of our[2] Hecato that the limiting of desires helps also to cure fears: “Cease to hope,” he says, “and you will cease to fear.” “But how,” you will reply, “can things so different go side by side?” In this way, my dear Lucilius: though they do seem at variance, yet they are really united. Just as the same chain fastens the prisoner and the soldier who guards him, so hope and fear, dissimilar as they are, keep step together; fear follows hope.

I am not surprised that they proceed in this way; each alike belongs to a mind that is in suspense, a mind that is fretted by looking forward to the future. But the chief cause of both these ills is that we do not adapt ourselves to the present, but send our thoughts a long way ahead. And so foresight, the noblest blessing of the human race, becomes perverted.

Beasts avoid the dangers which they see, and when they have escaped them are free from care; but we men torment ourselves over that which is to come as well as over that which is past. Many of our blessings bring bane to us; for memory recalls the tortures of fear, while foresight anticipates them. The present alone can make no man wretched. Farewell.

 

LETTER 61

On Meeting Death Cheerfully

Let us cease to desire that which we have been desiring. I, at least, am doing this: in my old age I have ceased to desire what I desired when a boy. To this single end my days and my nights are passed; this is my task, this the object of my thoughts—to put an end to my chronic ills. I am endeavouring to live every day as if it were a complete life. I do not indeed snatch it up as if it were my last; I do regard it, however, as if it might even be my last.

The present letter is written to you with this in mind as if death were about to call me away in the very act of writing. I am ready to depart, and I shall enjoy life just because I am not over-anxious as to the future date of my departure.

Before I became old I tried to live well; now that I am old, I shall try to die well; but dying well means dying gladly. See to it that you never do anything unwillingly.

That which is bound to be a necessity if you rebel, is not a necessity if you desire it. This is what I mean: he who takes his orders gladly, escapes the bitterest part of slavery—doing what one does not want to do. The man who does something under orders is not unhappy; he is unhappy who does something against his will. Let us therefore so set our minds in order that we may desire whatever is demanded of us by circumstances, and above all that we may reflect upon our end without sadness.

We must make ready for death before we make ready for life. Life is well enough furnished, but we are too greedy with regard to its furnishings; something always seems to us lacking, and will always seem lacking. To have lived long enough depends neither upon our years nor upon our days, but upon our minds. I have lived, my dear friend Lucilius, long enough. I have had my fill;[1] I await death. Farewell.

LETTER 70

On the Proper Time to Slip the Cable

After a long space of time I have seen your beloved Pompeii.[1] I was thus brought again face to face with the days of my youth. And it seemed to me that I could still do, nay, had only done a short time ago, all the things which I did there when a young man. We have sailed past life, Lucilius, as if we were on a voyage, and just as when at sea, to quote from our poet Vergil,

Lands and towns are left astern,[2]

even so, on this journey where time flies with the greatest speed, we put below the horizon first our boyhood and then our youth, and then the space which lies between young manhood and middle age and borders on both, and next, the best years of old age itself. Last of all, we begin to sight the general bourne of the race of man.

Fools that we are, we believe this bourne to be a dangerous reef; but it is the harbour, where we must some day put in, which we may never refuse to enter; and if a man has reached this harbour in his early years, he has no more right to complain than a sailor who has made a quick voyage. For some sailors, as you know, are tricked and held back by sluggish winds, and grow weary and sick of the slow-moving calm; while others are carried quickly home by steady gales.

You may consider that the same thing happens to us: life has carried some men with the greatest rapidity to the harbour, the harbour they were bound to reach even if they tarried on the way, while others it has fretted and harassed. To such a life, as you are aware, one should not always cling. For mere living is not a good, but living well. Accordingly, the wise man will live as long as he ought, not as long as he can.[3]

He will mark in what place, with whom, and how he is to conduct his existence, and what he is about to do. He always reflects concerning the quality, and not the quantity, of his life. As soon as there are many events in his life that give him trouble and disturb his peace of mind, he sets himself free. And this privilege is his, not only when the crisis is upon him, but as soon as Fortune seems to be playing him false; then he looks about carefully and sees whether he ought, or ought not, to end his life on that account. He holds that it makes no difference to him whether his taking-off be natural or self-inflicted, whether it comes later or earlier. He does not regard it with fear, as if it were a great loss; for no man can lose very much when but a driblet remains.

It is not a question of dying earlier or later, but of dying well or ill. And dying well means escape from the danger of living ill.

That is why I regard the words of the well-known Rhodian[4] as most unmanly. This person was thrown into a cage by his tyrant, and fed there like some wild animal. And when a certain man advised him to end his life by fasting, he replied: “A man may hope for anything while he has life.”

This may be true; but life is not to be purchased at any price. No matter how great or how well-assured certain rewards may be I shall not strive to attain them at the price of a shameful confession of weakness. Shall I reflect that Fortune has all power over one who lives, rather than reflect that she has no power over one who knows how to die?

There are times, nevertheless, when a man, even though certain death impends and he knows that torture is in store for him, will refrain from lending a hand to his own punishment, to himself, however, he would lend a hand.[5] It is folly to die through fear of dying. The executioner is upon you; wait for him. Why anticipate him? Why assume the management of a cruel task that belongs to another? Do you grudge your executioner his privilege, or do you merely relieve him of his task?

Socrates might have ended his life by fasting; he might have died by starvation rather than by poison. But instead of this he spent thirty days in prison awaiting death, not with the idea “everything may happen,” or “so long an interval has room for many a hope” but in order that he might show himself submissive to the laws[6] and make the last moments of Socrates an edification to his friends. What would have been more foolish than to scorn death, and yet fear poison?[7]

Scribonia, a woman of the stern old type, was an aunt of Drusus Libo.[8] This young man was as stupid as he was well born, with higher ambitions than anyone could have been expected to entertain in that epoch, or a man like himself in any epoch at all. When Libo had been carried away ill from the senate-house in his litter, though certainly with a very scanty train of followers—for all his kinsfolk undutifully deserted him, when he was no longer a criminal but a corpse—he began to consider whether he should commit suicide, or await death. Scribonia said to him: “What pleasure do you find in doing another man’s work?” But he did not follow her advice; he laid violent hands upon himself. And he was right, after all; for when a man is doomed to die in two or three days at his enemy’s pleasure, he is really “doing another man’s work” if he continues to live.

No general statement can be made, therefore, with regard to the question whether, when a power beyond our control threatens us with death, we should anticipate death, or await it. For there are many arguments to pull us in either direction. If one death is accompanied by torture, and the other is simple and easy, why not snatch the latter? Just as I shall select my ship when I am about to go on a voyage or my house when I propose to take a residence, so I shall choose my death when I am about to depart from life.

Moreover, just as a long-drawn out life does not necessarily mean a better one, so a long-drawn-out death necessarily means a worse one. There is no occasion when the soul should be humoured more than at the moment of death. Let the soul depart as it feels itself impelled to go;[9] whether it seeks the sword, or the halter, or some drought that attacks the veins, let it proceed and burst the bonds of its slavery. Every man ought to make his life acceptable to others besides himself, but his death to himself alone. The best form of death is the one we like.

Men are foolish who reflect thus: “One person will say that my conduct was not brave enough; another, that I was too headstrong; a third, that a particular kind of death would have betokened more spirit.” What you should really reflect is: “I have under consideration a purpose with which the talk of men has no concern!” Your sole aim should be to escape from Fortune as speedily as possible; otherwise, there will be no lack of persons who will think ill of what you have done.

You can find men who have gone so far as to profess wisdom and yet maintain that one should not offer violence to one’s own life, and hold it accursed for a man to be the means of his own destruction; we should wait, say they, for the end decreed by nature. But one who says this does not see that he is shutting off the path to freedom. The best thing which eternal law ever ordained was that it allowed to us one entrance into life, but many exits.

Must I await the cruelty either of disease or of man, when I can depart through the midst of torture, and shake off my troubles? This is the one reason why we cannot complain of life; it keeps no one against his will. Humanity is well situated, because no man is unhappy except by his own fault. Live, if you so desire; if not, you may return to the place whence you came.

You have often been cupped in order to relieve headaches.[10] You have had veins cut for the purpose of reducing your weight. If you would pierce your heart, a gaping wound is not necessary—a lancet will open the way to that great freedom, and tranquillity can be purchased at the cost of a pin-prick.

What, then, is it which makes us lazy and sluggish? None of us reflects that some day he must depart from this house of life; just so old tenants are kept from moving by fondness for a particular place and by custom, even in spite of ill-treatment.

Would you be free from the restraint of your body? Live in it as if you were about to leave it. Keep thinking of the fact that some day you will be deprived of this tenure; then you will be more brave against the necessity of departing. But how will a man take thought of his own end, if he craves all things without end?

And yet there is nothing so essential for us to consider. For our training in other things is perhaps superfluous. Our souls have been made ready to meet poverty; but our riches have held out. We have armed ourselves to scorn pain; but we have had the good fortune to possess sound and healthy bodies, and so have never been forced to put this virtue to the test. We have taught ourselves to endure bravely the loss of those we love; but Fortune has preserved to us all whom we loved.

It is in this one matter only that the day will come which will require us to test our training. You need not think that none but great men have had the strength to burst the bonds of human servitude; you need not believe that this cannot be done except by a Cato—Cato, who with his hand dragged forth the spirit which he had not succeeded in freeing by the sword. Nay, men of the meanest lot in life have by a mighty impulse escaped to safety, and when they were not allowed to die at their own convenience, or to suit themselves in their choice of the instruments of death, they have snatched up whatever was lying ready to hand, and by sheer strength have turned objects which were by nature harmless into weapons of their own.

For example, there was lately in a training-school for wild beast gladiators a German, who was making ready for the morning exhibition; he withdrew in order to relieve himself—the only thing which he was allowed to do in secret and without the presence of a guard. While so engaged, he seized the stick of wood, tipped with a sponge, which was devoted to the vilest uses, and stuffed it, just as it was, down his throat; thus he blocked up his windpipe, and choked the breath from his body. That was truly to insult death!

Yes, indeed; it was not a very elegant or becoming way to die; but what is more foolish than to be over-nice about dying? What a brave fellow! He surely deserved to be allowed to choose his fate! How bravely he would have wielded a sword! With what courage he would have hurled himself into the depths of the sea, or down a precipice! Cut off from resources on every hand, he yet found a way to furnish himself with death, and with a weapon for death. Hence you can understand that nothing but the will need postpone death. Let each man judge the deed of this most zealous fellow as he likes, provided we agree on this point—that the foulest death is preferable to the fairest slavery

Inasmuch as I began with an illustration taken from humble life I shall keep on with that sort. For men will make greater demands upon themselves, if they see that death can be despised even by the most despised class of men. The Catos, the Scipios, and the others whose names we are wont to hear with admiration, we regard as beyond the sphere of imitation; but I shall now prove to you that the virtue of which I speak is found as frequently in the gladiators’ training-school as among the leaders in a civil war.

Lately a gladiator, who had been sent forth to the morning exhibition, was being conveyed in a cart along with the other prisoners;[11] nodding as if he were heavy with sleep, he let his head fall over so far that it was caught in the spokes; then he kept his body in position long enough to break his neck by the revolution of the wheel. So he made his escape by means of the very wagon which was carrying him to his punishment. When a man desires to burst forth and take his departure, nothing stands in his way. It is an open space in which Nature guards us.

When our plight is such as to permit it, we may look about us for an easy exit. If you have many opportunities ready to hand, by means of which you may liberate yourself, you may make a selection and think over the best way of gaining freedom; but if a chance is hard to find, instead of the best, snatch the next best, even though it be something unheard of, something new. If you do not lack the courage, you will not lack the cleverness, to die.

See how even the lowest class of slave, when suffering goads him on, is aroused and discovers a way to deceive even the most watchful guards! He is truly great who not only has given himself the order to die, but has also found the means.

I have promised you, however, some more illustrations drawn from the same games.

During the second event in a sham sea-fight one of the barbarians sank deep into his own throat a spear which had been given him for use against his foe. “Why, oh why,” he said, “have I not long ago escaped from all this torture and all this mockery? Why should I be armed and yet wait for death to come?” This exhibition was all the more striking because of the lesson men learn from it that dying is more honourable than killing.

What then? If such a spirit is possessed by abandoned and dangerous men, shall it not be possessed also by those who have trained themselves to meet such contingencies by long meditation, and by reason, the mistress of all things? It is reason which teaches us that fate has various ways of approach, but the same end, and that it makes no difference at what point the inevitable event begins.

Reason, too, advises us to die, if we may, according to our taste; if this cannot be, she advises us to die according to our ability, and to seize upon whatever means shall offer itself for doing violence to ourselves. It is criminal to “live by robbery”;[12] but, on the other hand, it is most noble to “die by robbery.” Farewell.

 

Enter Cj

Why I Love Thinking Of Death So Much And What I’m Doing With It

I love thinking of death because it brings me happiness. Thinking of death brings awareness to our small amount of time here and all my priorities into perspective so I can live out this human life I was given. I don’t know what life is all about but right now in this very moment, I think it is just about making progress (until we destroy ourselves with AI, just kidding haha). To make as much progress as we can we need time and open minds free of worry and full of awareness. I think bringing this idea to people is a positive and that is why I have made something to keep with someone at all times to think about.

 

What is it?

Memento Mori

Link  – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memento_mori

Wiki definition – Memento mori (Latin: “remember that you have to die”)[2] is the medieval Latin Christian theory and practice of reflection on mortality, especially as a means of considering the vanity of earthly life and the transient nature of all earthly goods and pursuits. It is related to the ars moriendi (“The Art of Dying”) and similar literature. Memento mori has been an important part of ascetic disciplines as a means of perfecting the character by cultivating detachment and other virtues, and by turning the attention towards the immortality of the soul and the afterlife.[3]

Painting by Philippe de Champaigne to express the idea of Life Death and Time

I have taken my own take on this and incorporated it into a 3D printed metal coin to be carried around at all times. I think the rose to me stands for life and I also incorporated a time glass with a skull who has a smile because it makes me smile thinking I can die at any moment.

The coin is for sale here – https://floatsyourboats.com/collections/frontpage/products/memento-mori-coin

On the back I have incorporated a line from Siddartha that has really hit home for me and I have taken away so much that I had to add it on the coin to remind myself as a human I can do this.

Siddhartha: “Everyone takes, everyone gives. Life is like that.”

Merchant: “Ah, but if you are without possessions, how can you give?”

Siddhartha: “Everyone gives what he has. The soldier gives strength, the merchant goods, the teacher instructions, the farmer rice, the fisherman fish.”
Merchant: Very well and what can you give? What have you learned that you can give.”
Siddhartha: “I can think, I can wait, I can fast.”
Merchant: Is that all?”

Siddhartha: “I think that is all.”

Merchant: And of what use are they? For example, fasting, what good is that?”

Siddhartha: It is of great value, sir. If a man has nothing to eat, fasting is the most intelligent thing he can do. If, for instance, Siddhartha had not learned to fast, he would have had to seek some kind of work today, either with you, or elsewhere, for hunger would have driven him. But, as it is, Siddhartha can wait calmly. He is not impatient, he is not in need, he can ward off hunger for a long time and laugh at it.

I also incorporated while we are here which is a take off one of the philosophers I look up to the most and relate with to learn from which is Marcus Aurelius. My take on when Marcus says“You could leave life right now”. I just made that into while I’m here.

The coin is for sale here – https://floatsyourboats.com/collections/frontpage/products/memento-mori-coin

And the art – https://floatsyourboats.com/collections/art/products/canvas-1

Now with all this in mind, I would love to leave you with one last video to have blow your mind.

 

[Note: Do Not comment on this blog about this video. If you want to collab and create a discussion regarding this video please do it in the link here with the video. All comments are for this blog in general. Thank you:) Also you can search for almost anything that was in the video in these links if you have to go back to something.
Also Note*  Collaborating is amazing. Critical feedback is welcome. I am keeping it Good Vibes Only anything else will be deleted. Share The Love. No spam or personal branding!!!! Thank you. Let’s make some new ideas and have fun:)]

 

Where to find everyone

Tim Ferriss

Website – https://tim.blog/

YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/user/masterlock77

Twitter – https://twitter.com/tferriss

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/timferriss/?hl=en

 

Sam Harris

Website – https://samharris.org/

YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/user/samharrisorg

Twitter – https://twitter.com/SamHarrisOrg

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/samharrisorg/?hl=en

 

Neil deGrasse Tyson

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/neildegrassetyson

Twitter – https://twitter.com/neiltyson

 

Find Me CJ Lewis @

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/cjlewisviews/

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/cjlewisviews/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/CjLewisviews

YouTube  – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHmHDqPCYbm5hiqrzuBkcFw?view_as=subscriber

My Book

Brain Priming – https://www.amazon.com/Brain-Priming-Cj-Lewis/dp/1978321104/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1510426815&sr=8-1&keywords=brain+priming

School of Thought

https://cjlewis.blog/category/school-of-thought/

My Album 

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/baby-im-nobody/1346747598

 

 

Leave a Reply